Property Surveyors, sometimes referred to as land Surveyors, play a vital role in the real estate world. They are the professionals who determine or confirm the exact boundaries of a property.

 

Will you need to deal with a Property Surveyor when selling your home?

 

You might.

 

Sometimes the mortgage lender will ask for a land survey, especially if your property is older and hasn’t changed hands in many years. You might also be asked for one by the buyer if there is any confusion about the size and boundaries of your property – or if significant changes have been made to it in recent years.

 

This is nothing to be concerned about.

 

A qualified Property Surveyor will do the appropriate inspection and measurements on your property and issue you the survey. (It looks a little like a blueprint.)

 

Property Surveyors are highly trained and licensed. In the United States, the profession is represented by the National Society of Professional Surveyors, with each state having its own governing body. In Canada, Professional Surveyors Canada (PSC) represents the profession nationally, and most provinces have their own professional associations. 

 

Before getting a new land survey, make sure you don’t already have one. Hopefully, you’ve stored the paperwork that relates to the purchase of your home. Look through it. A valid land survey might be right there.

 

If you have questions about land surveys, call today.

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It’s early in the evening and there’s a knock on the door. You answer and are greeted by an official-looking man who claims he needs to see your utility bill to confirm you’re getting your energy rebate.

Do you let him in?

While he may be legitimate, he may also be using deception to sell you something you don’t want. Here are some suggestions for finding out:

  • Ask for a business card. Then, check if it has an address, phone number and website. If the salesperson refuses or just shows you his ID card (which anyone can fake), that’s a red flag.
  • Ask for the name of his employer. Sometimes salespeople will say they “represent the phone company”. That doesn’t mean they actually work for it.
  • Ask if you can call his company to confirm details before buying. If he refuses, or says the office is closed, shut the door.
  • Ask if you can consider the offer and call the office the next day to place your order.
  • If you’re really suspicious, ask him to come back later. Then, call the non-emergency police number. Police are aware of common scams in the area.

Most importantly, use your common sense. Door-to-door salespeople can be pretty persuasive, but if something doesn’t seem right to you, trust your gut. Say, “No thanks.”

Of course, if everything checks out with the salesperson, and the offer is a good one, consider taking advantage of it.

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No matter how much you love your current property, you may be dreaming of the day you can buy up into a better home in a better neighbourhood.

 

Is that day today, or, is it a few years down the road?

 

Here’s a quick way to make that assessment.

 

First, make a list of all the practical reasons why it might be time to move up. Those reasons might include features such as: more bedrooms, proximity to work and school, a larger backyard with trees, nearby parks and walking paths and better access to things you enjoy like theatre.

 

Next, make a list of the emotional reasons for making such a move. Those reasons might include memorable get-togethers with friends on a more spacious deck, an easier and less stressful commute to work, more family time with the kids and enjoyable Saturday golf at a nearby course.

 

Finally, take a financial snapshot to determine if you can afford to move up. You’ll need to get a good idea of what your current property will sell for in today’s market, average price of homes in your desired neighbourhood, and how much mortgage you’ll need.

 

Once you have all that down on paper, you’ll have a clear picture of your readiness. If the practical and emotional reasons for buying up are compelling, and you can afford to make the move, then you have your answer.

The time is now!

 

By the way, if you need help in making this determination – especially figuring out what your home will likely sell for, call today 604-834-(SELL)7355

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You’re standing by your window admiring the view. Then you notice it. Moisture has built-up around the edges of the glass. Should you worry?

 

It all depends on the reason for the build up.

 

Assuming you have traditional double-pane glass in your windows, there are a few things to look for if you notice moisture.

 

Often, moisture at the bottom of the windows is simply caused by too much humidity in your indoor air. If that’s the case, simply adjust your humidifier.

 

If the moisture is on the exterior of the window, typically there’s also no problem with the window itself. It may have rained recently or the outside humidity may have spiked causing the accumulation. Generally, there’s no reason for concern.

 

However, if the moisture is in between the two panes of glass, the seal has broken and surrounding air – along with its water content – has made its way in. This disrupts the thermal barrier of the window, reducing its energy efficiency. In fact, the glass might feel noticeably colder than your other windows on chilly days. In that case, you’ll need to replace the pane.

 

Similarly, if the moisture is coming in through only one spot — the bottom right corner, for example — then you might have a leak. If you have a wood frame or sill, you may also notice a growing water stain. It’s important to get leaks fixed quickly. There may be water damage occurring within the frame that you cannot see.

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When you’re about to sell your home, it may be disheartening to see so many other properties for sale in your neighbourhood. You may be thinking, “That’s a lot of competition! Will our property get noticed?”

 

Fortunately, there are many proven strategies for standing out in a sea of For Sale signs.

 

First of all, keep in mind that many home purchasers come from the REALTOR’S personal network of buyers who want to move into your area. So, choosing the right REALTOR® is crucial.

 

Second, remember that when there are other properties for sale on your street, curb appeal becomes even more important. There are many simple things you can do to make your property look great to those driving around looking at homes. Make sure your property looks as picture perfect as possible.

 

In a competitive market, it’s also more important than ever to highlight features of your home that are unique and enticing. If, for example, you have a large backyard deck and brand new hardwood flooring, make sure these are mentioned prominently on the feature sheet.

 

Finally, be as flexible as you can be when scheduling viewings and open houses. Don’t forget that other listed properties in your neighbourhood draw in buyers, who may notice your home. It’s not uncommon for a buyer to view a property and then scout the neighbourhood. So, you want buyers to be able to see your home on short notice and at a convenient time for them. If there are several other nearby properties for sale, it means things are hot from a real estate point of view. You want to roll out the red carpet to buyers.

 

Looking for help selling your home quickly and for the best price? Call today! (778) 834-7355

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A pantry is the ideal nook for storing extra food and other items ordinarily crammed into the kitchen. It’s also a nice design feature, as it harkens back to the days of country kitchens with spacious pantries.

 

You might be thinking, “That’s nice, but our home doesn’t have a pantry.”

 

That’s okay. These days, there are many ways to create a pantry in your home – even if it doesn’t have one! Here are just a few suggestions:

 

  • Add shelves to the laundry room. If you have the space, this is the ideal place to create a mini-pantry.

 

  • Purchase a portable pantry. There are many available on the market. Some are even disguised as cabinets you’d expect to see in living and dining rooms.

 

  • Purchase a movable pantry. These units are on wheels and can slide in and out of the kitchen with ease. Some are short enough to slide conveniently under a kitchen table.

 

  • Make use of an unused closet. These are rare in most homes, but if you have a closet that isn’t being used, it can easily be converted into a pantry.

 

As you can see, there are plenty of options available. You don’t necessarily need to build an extra room!

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When considering which of two or more competing offers to accept for your home, there is no doubt price plays a huge role. After all, if Offer #1 is $10,000 higher than Offer #2, that’s an enticing difference that puts thousands of extra dollars in your pocket.

 

However, price isn’t the only thing you should think about when comparing multiple offers. There are other factors you need to consider as well.

 

For example, what conditions are in the offer? If Offer #1 is conditional upon the buyer selling his current property for a specific amount, then what if that doesn’t happen? You could end up with an offer that dies and be forced to list your home all over again.

 

In that circumstance, accepting the lower offer may be your best move.

 

There’s also financing to consider. Most buyers will attach a certificate from their mortgage lender to show that they can afford the home and will likely secure financing with little difficulty. If you get an offer where the ability of the buyer to get financing is in doubt, that’s a red flag.

 

The closing date is another important factor. Offer #1 might propose a closing date that’s perfect for you, while Offer #2 is four weeks later. If you’ve already purchased another home, you might require a month of bridge financing if you accept Offer #2. There’s nothing wrong with that per se, but the costs and additional hassle are factors you should consider.

 

As you can see, assessing competing offers isn’t as easy as it looks. Fortunately, as your REALTOR®, I will guide you toward making the right decision.

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You can’t call yourself a dentist unless you have specific hard-earned credentials. Just about anyone, however, can hang a shingle and call himself a home improvement contractor. That’s why choosing a reputable one is so difficult. Here are some tips:

  • Find out if he or she is truly in business full-time. A part-time or occasional contractor may not have the experience necessary to do a great job.
  • Ask about licenses and other credentials. Some contractors have accreditations from professional and trade associations.
  • Review his or her project portfolio. A reputable contractor will have photos and other evidence of work completed for similar clients.
  • Check online for reviews. If there are more than five poor reviews within the past three years — that’s a red flag.
  • Ask for references. Then, call at least one.

Finally, the best contractors are those that get recommended by people you trust.

Looking for a contractor recommendation? Call today 788-834-SELL (7355)

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Figuring out how much time you should spend viewing properties for sale is a little like asking, “How long should I spend trying on shoes?”

The answer seems obvious: As long as it takes to make a decision!

Buying a home is significantly more complex than purchasing shoes – and the stakes are higher too! You need to make sure you have all the information necessary to confidently make the best decision.

There are basically three stages to viewing a property:

  1. Macro
  2. Micro
  3. Professional

When you view a home on a macro basis, you’re looking at it from an overall perspective. For example, you may do a general walk-through to get a first impression and determine if the property has the basic features you need, such as the number of bedrooms and the size of the backyard.

Macro viewing is often the fastest stage in the viewing process and can sometimes take just a few minutes.

If you like what you see, then it’s onto the micro stage. At this stage you take a closer look at the details of the property. You might, for example, spend extra time in the master bedroom imagining how your furniture would look and fit.

The micro stage takes longer simply because the home is now on your shortlist. You’re interested and are considering making an offer.

Finally, the professional stage involves getting a qualified home inspector to go over the property with a fine tooth comb. That typically occurs after you’ve made an offer.

As your REALTOR®, I will guide you through a viewing so you’ll know what to look for and can make a smart, informed decision. Call today 778-834-SELL (7355)

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Imagine buying a product from a store, taking it home, and then discovering there’s a problem with it. Disappointing, yes, but not a catastrophe. You can simply take it back for repair or exchange.

 

But, what if it’s moving day, and you discover there’s a problem with your new home? Whoa. A house isn’t so easily returned!

 

What are the most common problems encountered on moving day?

 

  • A delay in getting the keys.
  • The seller not having completely moved out.
  • An item expected to be included with the property is missing. (For example, the window blinds.)
  • Something needs repair that was not disclosed by the seller, nor did it come up during inspection. (For example, the dishwasher not working.)
  • Damage to the property caused by the seller. (For example, a heavy item dropped during the move and cracking a floor tile.)

 

Fortunately, these are rare events. In most cases, you can expect no serious issues when you move into your new home.

 

But, if something is wrong, you have options. So, call me immediately at 778-834-7355. In all likelihood, I will be able to quickly resolve the issue.

 

If it’s a serious matter, such as missing items, I may get your real estate lawyer involved to arrange for the return of the item(s) or compensation.

 

So don’t worry. Let the professionals handle it. You can just enjoy your new home!

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Getting Friends to Spread the Word about Your Listing

 

 

When you list your home for sale, you want as many buyers as possible to find out about it. So consider how many friends, neighbours and work colleagues you have. Then think about how many people they know.

 

The number is likely in the hundreds. One of those people could be looking for a property just like yours.

 

That’s why getting your friends to spread the word about your listing is so effective. How do you do that?

 

One strategy is to have a moving party. This gives you an opportunity to ask your friends, as a group, to tell others about your listing.

 

You can also encourage your friends to bring a guest who is currently in the market for a new home.

 

Another good idea is to put a profile of your listing on Facebook. This is the fastest and most convenient way for your Facebook friends to point others to your listing.

 

Do you have friends who work at larger organizations like banks and factories? They probably have access to an employee lunch room with a bulletin board. You can spread the word by asking them to put up an information sheet on your listing.

 

Try one or more of these ideas. Combined with my marketing plan for you, they can help get more qualified buyers to your doorstep.

 

Want more tips on promoting your listing? Call today.

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Important Things to “Fix Up” before Selling

 

 

 

When you’re preparing your home for sale, it’s not unusual to need to fix up a few things around the property. After all, you want your home to look its best to buyers, so that you get good offers, quickly.

 

What do you need to fix? Here are three categories that will help you create and prioritize your list.

 

1. Anything that squeaks or creaks.

 

Is there something in your home that makes a noise it shouldn’t be making? Perhaps it’s a rattling closet door or a creaking floor board? You may be so used to it you no longer notice the sound. But buyers will. Be sure to get those items fixed.

 

2. Anything that’s unsightly.

 

You don’t have to make your home look perfect. However, things that are unsightly will likely get buyers’ attention. You want them to focus on the terrific features of your property, not the scuff on the wall. Take a walk through your property, including the yard. Pretend you’re the buyer. Do you notice anything that doesn’t look good? If so, tidy it up, fix it up or replace it.

 

3. Anything that’s broken.

 

If there’s anything that needs repair — an outside tap that’s not working, or a sliding door that regularly careens off its runner — call the contractor or fix it yourself.

 

Getting these items fixed will go a long way toward making your home appealing to buyers.

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Making an Offer in a Competitive Market

 

Imagine finding a home you love, making an offer, and then finding out there are other competing offers on the table. Ouch.

 

If you’re looking for a property in a competitive market, it is likely that there will be multiple offers. Even just one can create the risk that you’ll lose the home. So how do you make sure your offer is enticing enough to win over the seller?

 

Here are some ideas:

 

• Don’t make a low-ball offer. If you do, it might be dismissed and you probably won’t get another chance to bid — especially if the other competing offers are near the listing price.

 

• Have a pre-arranged mortgage and include that with your offer. This reassures the seller there won’t be any money issues. (Most lenders will provide you with a pre-arranged mortgage certificate for this purpose.)

 

• Go in with a price high enough that the seller will be interested, but not so high as to be leaving money on the table. This is tricky and requires a savvy knowledge of the current market.

 

• Have a REALTOR® present the offer on your behalf. A REALTOR® will know how to do so professionally, and in a manner that gives you the best chance of getting the home.

 

In a competitive situation, working with a REALTOR® who is an expert on the local market — and a skilled negotiator — is crucial.

 

Looking for a REALTOR® like that? Call me today 778-834-7355.

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How to Cut Your Electricity Bill in Half

 

 

You don’t have to freeze in the winter or start reading by candlelight to reduce your electricity bill. There are many simple ways to use less power with little, if any, impact on your lifestyle.

 

A good place to start is with your electronics.

 

According to the David Suzuki Foundation, “Any gizmo that has a clock, digital timer, remote control or standby mode is sucking energy when it's not being used (it's called 'phantom electricity' — and it's scary how much of it there is).” So keep them unplugged as much as possible. Also, unplug charger cords for phone and computers when not in use. Even when not connected to the device, they still suck power.

 

Another easy change to make involves your lights. Switching to compact fluorescent (CFL) or LED light bulbs can save you a lot of energy. They’re 75% more efficient.

 

Finally, the old-fashioned method of insulating doors and windows can work wonders for lowering your electricity bill. In fact, some particularly drafty homes can lose up to 40% of their heat. Check for drafts regularly and repair or replace insulation as needed.

 

None of these ideas will impact your day-to-day living. Yet, they could potentially save you a bundle.

 

Just some small tips to save money even through snowmageddon.

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I have quite a few clients that are first time buyers and they've either shyed away from jumping head first into the rising market because of bidding wars or high cost, but now the government has stepped in and offered some help. The deal with the loan that everyone should be aware of is... It is a loan. You do have to pay it back in full, its not free money. The loan is interest free for the first 5 years, which is nice, but come year 5, you are responsible for keeping up with your monthly installments. 

 

As of January 16th the applicantions for the first time buyer's loan have been opened. They are set to approve 30 applications right off the bat. 

 

"Those already hunting for their first home, however, should know the loans are not available right away — the closing date on a purchase must be after Feb. 15, 2017 for your application to be considered."

 

Premier Christy Clark has said the second-mortgage program will help first-time homebuyers get into the "really tough housing market," but critics say it exposes buyers to too much debt and favours "a very privileged set of people." 

 

"If you get into the marketplace and get a little bit of equity, it can change your life," said B.C. Housing Minister Rich Coleman, who shared the story of his first home — a mobile home in Alberta — before building his own house a year later.

 

"The challenge of course is coming up with that down payment." Coleman said Monday afternoon that about 60 applications had already been started, 29 were submitted, and eight would receive letters of approval on Tuesday.

 

This loan is something you should think long and hard about taking. It does serve a purpose for those that just need to get there "in" into the real estate market. 

 

If you have any other questions about getting into the real estate market, please feel free to give me a call 778-834-7355. 

 

Full report from CBC News 

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We can safely say that we have noticed a shift in the real estate market in Greater Vancouver. Since the 15% forgein buyer tax was implemented we have noticed that homes are rarely going into bidding wars and subjects are beginning to be looked at and accepted again. Most of the buyers (including first time home buyers) are coming out and finally ready to pull the trigger on buying a home without feeling like they must compete. This is glimpsing back to what the Real Estate market was like 3-4 years ago. This article from Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver shows the dip in the real estate market: 

 

"Residential property sales in the region totalled 2,233 in October 2016, a 38.8 per cent decrease from the 3,646 sales recorded in October 2015 and a 0.9 per cent decrease compared to September 2016 when 2,253 homes sold. Last month’s sales were 15 per cent below the 10-year October sales average.

 

“Changing market conditions compounded by a series of government interventions this year have put home buyers and sellers in a holding pattern,” Dan Morrison, Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) president said. “Potential buyers and sellers are taking a wait-and-see approach to try and better understand what these changes mean for them.”

 

New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Metro Vancouver totalled 3,981 in October 2016. This represents a decrease of 3.5 per cent compared to the 4,126 units listed in October 2015 and a 17 per cent decrease compared to September 2016 when 4,799 properties were listed. Last month’s new listing count was 9.5 per cent below the region’s 10-year new listing average for the month.

 

The total number of properties currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 9,143, a 4.5 per cent decrease compared to October 2015 (9,569) and a 2.3 per cent decrease compared to September 2016 (9,354).

 

The sales-to-active listings ratio for October 2016 is 24.4 per cent. Generally, analysts say that downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below the 12 per cent mark for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.

 

“While sales are down across the different property types, it’s the detached market that’s seen the largest reduction in home buyer demand in recent months,” Morrison said. “It’s important to work with your local REALTOR® to help you navigate today’s changing trends.”

 

The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $919,300. This represents a 24.8 per cent increase compared to October 2015 and a 0.8 per cent decline compared to September 2016.

 

Sales of detached properties in October 2016 reached 652, a decrease of 54.6 per cent from the 1,437 detached sales recorded in October 2015. The benchmark price for detached properties is $1,545,800. This represents a 28.9 per cent increase compared to October 2015 and a 1.4 per cent decrease compared to September 2016.

 

Sales of apartment properties reached 1,178 in October 2016, a decrease of 23.7 per cent compared to the 1,543 sales in October 2015.The benchmark price of an apartment property is $512,300. This represents a 20.5 per cent increase compared to October 2015 and a 0.3 per cent increase compared to September 2016.

 

Attached property sales in October 2016 totalled 403, a decrease of 39.5 per cent compared to the 666 sales in October 2015. The benchmark price of an attached unit is $669,200. This represents a 25.7 per cent increase compared to October 2015 and a 1.1 per cent decrease compared to September 2016."

 

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Buyers & Sellers Face Changes in Real Estate Market 

Metro Vancouver home sales totalled 2,253 in September 2016, a decrease of 32.6 per cent from the 3,345 sales recorded in September 2015 and a decrease of 9.5 per cent compared to August 2016 when 2,489 homes sold.

 

Last month’s sales were 9.6 per cent below the 10-year sales average for the month. “Supply and demand conditions differ today depending on property type,” Dan Morrison, REBGV president said. “We’re seeing more demand for condominiums and townhomes today than in the detached home market.”

 

New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Metro Vancouver totalled 4,799 in September 2016. This represents a decrease of one per cent compared to the 4,846 units listed in September 2015 and an 11.8 per cent increase compared to August 2016 when 4,293 properties were listed.

 

The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 9,354, a 13.4 per cent decline compared to September 2015 (10,805) and a 10 per cent increase compared to August 2016 (8,506).

 

The sales-to-active listings ratio for September 2016 is 24.1 per cent. This is the lowest this ratio has been since February 2015. Generally, analysts say that downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below the 12 per cent mark, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it reaches the 20 to 22 per cent range in a particular community for a sustained period.

 

“Changing market conditions are easing upward pressure on home prices in our region,” Morrison said. “There’s uncertainty in the market at the moment and home buyers and sellers are having difficulty establishing price as a result. To help you understand the factors affecting prices, it’s important to talk with a REALTOR®.”

 

The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $931,900. This represents a 28.9 per cent increase compared to September 2015 and a 0.1 per cent decline compared to August 2016.

 

Sales of detached properties in September 2016 reached 666, a decrease of 47.6 per cent from the 1,272 detached sales recorded in September 2015. The benchmark price for detached properties is $1,579,400. This represents a 33.7 per cent increase compared to September 2015 and a 0.1 per cent increase compared to August 2016.

 

Sales of apartment properties reached 1,218 in September 2016, a decrease of 20.3 per cent compared to the 1,529 sales in September 2015.The benchmark price of an apartment property is $511,800. This represents a 23.5 per cent increase compared to September 2015 and a 0.5 per cent decline compared to August 2016.

 

Attached property sales in September 2016 totalled 369, a decrease of 32.2 per cent compared to the 544 sales in September 2015. The benchmark price of an attached unit is $677,000. This represents a 29.1 per cent increase compared to September 2015 and a 0.1 per cent decline compared to August 2016.

 

Repost from Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver website. Original article HERE 

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Vancouver housing is expensive and always has been!

I loved this article and had to share it! It's from the BC Business website. Original link below! 

 

Vancouver has a long history of pricey housing, especially since the Second World War, and an equally long history of speculation about causes and potential solutions. In 1949, the Vancouver Housing Association noted, “There is a widespread illusion that with the rise in incomes, home ownership is possible for almost everybody. The facts are that owing to a still greater rise in building costs, fewer people can afford to build now than before the war.”

 

By the 1960s, the chairman of the Vancouver housing committee was recommending smaller lots or row housing to address affordability, while the Greater Vancouver Real Estate Board touted infill housing in 1976 to ease the high cost of single family homes. Just a year earlier, the United Way of Greater Vancouver was blaming municipal red tape for the skyrocketing cost of housing.

 

The Canadian Real Estate Association first started tracking housing market statistics in 1980, and since that time Vancouver real estate has been the priciest in the country—apart from a period in the late ’80s when Toronto briefly pulled ahead (see graph below). Ever since, however, Vancouver has been in a league of its own—with prices spiralling upward to increasingly dizzying heights. This year appeared to follow that trend—at least until the province muddied the waters with a foreign buyer’s tax in June 2016. Whatever that tax’s impact, there’s little doubt that talk about “our crazy market” will continue for many years to come.

 

What people have been saying throughout the decades...

 

THE '80s

 

“People should not think single family home ownership is a right and ... a young couple should not expect their first home to be like the one their parents had.” –Vancouver Sun, April 2, 1981

 

“Real estate is expensive because land is scarce around the city and because ‘Vancouver is the California of Canada,’ says Carl Nielsen, president of Block Brothers Realty Ltd.” –The Gazette, June 12, 1985

 

“Real estate analysts attribute the current housing boom to B.C.’s strong economy and to growing interest from offshore buyers.” –Vancouver Sun, January 5, 1989

 

THE '90s

 

“Vancouver has the highest cost of housing in Canada, after three years of rapid increases that pushed the price in several working-class neighbourhoods beyond the reach of many new home buyers.” –Globe and Mail, August 12, 1993

 

“Colossal increases in the price of average-sized lots have made many new houses unaffordable for average homeowners.” –Vancouver Sun, May 4, 1996

 

“Vancouver continued to be the most expensive city in Canada for house buyers last year despite steep price declines.” –Globe and Mail, January 5, 1999

 

THE 2000s

 

“The cost of housing in Vancouver, already the highest in Canada, is predicted to climb still higher, an RBC report says today.... Not only is the city’s housing the least affordable of any major Canadian city, it’s the least affordable it has been in more than five years.” –Vancouver Sun, November 18, 2004

 

“The buzz leading up to the 2010 Winter Olympics will continue to drive up housing prices in Vancouver next year, Royal LePage said yesterday in a new market survey.” –The Province, December 18, 2007

 

THE 2010s

 

“[I]n Vancouver, the country’s priciest market, as in other ‘globalized’ markets like Sydney and Hong Kong, Asian wealth is coming in as investors diversify and look for hard assets, fuelling valuations that in some cases are ‘extreme.’” –Globe and Mail, June 16, 2011

 

“Soaring housing prices have squeezed out a generation of young buyers from ever owning a place with a front lawn and backyard.” –Globe and Mail, June 3, 2015

 

Original & Full Article from BC Business link : HERE 

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Tri-City Neighbourhood Profile: Pitt Meadows

 

Those that grew up closer to Vancouver or in Vancouver think Pitt Meadows is extremely far way, when in actuality it is quite close. With the newer Pitt River bridge it's a breeze to commute from downtown Vancouver into Pitt Meadows.

 

Pitt Meadows is located just across the Pitt River bridge, its a small yet strong community. There are people of all ages, and all walks of life living there. From condos to homes with acreage there is something for everyone within your budget. There are many growing families in this quiet city due to the fact that their are so many schools within walking distance, parks, bike trails, and activities at your door step. This city has a huge sense of community. Neighbours watch out for neighbours, kids still play in the streets, and the community comes together a few times a year to celebrate days such as Pitt Meadows Day! Pitt Meadows Day is a parade that comes down Harris Road (the main drag) at the beginning of the every summer. It's a way for the people of Pitt Meadows and some people from Maple Ridge to support those working in the community and have a few laughs at the firemen dressed up like clowns. Don't miss the Pancake breakfast and BBQ dinner put on by the Lions Club and the Firefighters.

 

Parts of Pitt Meadows to keep your eye on - Osprey Village, Somerset, Farmlands, and South Bonson. If your in the market for a house, keep your eyes open for the Bonson area (has many newer homes) or Somerset for the older yet well-kept neighbourhood. The homeowners in Pitt Meadows take pride in their homes and you can tell just by taking a drive down one of the many residential streets. 

 

Best places to eat in Pitt Meadows:

 

1.) Lunch Doctor - Only open Tuesday-Saturday until 4pm but the best homemade sandwiches and soups in the city. 

2.) Artista Pizza - BEST Napolitana style pizza made in a wood overn. 

3.) The Other Guys Pizza & Pasta - Their pastas are handmade and the pizzas have this delectable meat sauce instead of plain tomato sauce. 

4.) Kabuki Sushi - Inexpensive and very good sushi in the tri-cities.

5.) Jolly Coachman Pub - You can't go wrong with this pub. It's where all the locals of Pitt Meadows hang out 90% of the time. Meet your neighbours and new friends while enjoying their daily specials that you cannot resist. 

6.) Eat at one of the many golf clubs: Swaneset, Golden Eagle, Pitt Meadows Golf Club, Meadow Garden. 

7.) The many fruit stands set up in the summertime.

8.) Hopcott Meats - great food, takeaway lunches/dinner and great BBQ'ing meat.

 

What to do in Pitt Meadows:


- Walk the Dykes

- Walk along the Fraser River

- Stroll through Osprey Village

- Take your dog to the two large dog parks (Hoffman Park and North Bonson)

- Check out a $4.75 movie at Hollywood 3 Cinemas 

- Take flying lessons at the Pitt Meadows Airport

- Take a helicopter ride at Sky Helicopters 

- Sky drive! 

- Golf at one of the 4 golf clubs. 

- Pick fresh fruit in the summer at the various farms

- or just head to Winners/Homesense to do some shopping!

 

I can't say enough about this community. There is a facebook group once you move to Pitt Meadows that notifies you about everything going on in the community (good or bad). It's a great resource to stay informed. 

 

Detached home in Pitt Meadows range from $615,000 - $2,200,000. Attached homes range from $250,000 - $550,000. It has a price range that fits most buyers budgets. 

 

If you want to know more information about Pitt Meadows, feel free to check out the video on my website: 

http://taramatthews.com/neighbourhoods.html

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Tri-City Neighbourhood Profile: Port Moody

 

There are so many reasons to love Port Moody, it's quiet, right on the water, quaint, full of life, and a growing foodie haven. Port Moody has transformed itself over the years into a hub for young families and maturing couples. It's a great safe community to raise your children with fantastic schools and programs to entertain kids of all ages.

 

 

Why we love Port Moody:

 

Like stated in the first paragraph, Port Moody is a safe community. Children still play outside on sunny days and walk home from school, you'll always be greeted with a "hello" when walking your dog through Rocky Point, and you'll never have a shortage of cafes or restaurants to sit at and people watch. This lovely community is really becoming the most desirable neighbourhood to live in the tri-cities and the real estate prices show the demand.

 

Real Estate in Port Moody:

 

Port Moody has grown immensely with the additions of Klahanie, Suter Brook, The Station on St. Johns and of course Heritage Mountain. The rapid growth and quality developments have brought people from all over to this city. With the influx of people the demand for homes is greater then 5 years ago, and we are really seeing that demand raise housing prices to a record level. Townhomes in Klahanie range from $650,000 to $900,000, Houses on Heritage Mountain range from $1,000,000 to $2,500,000+. It's a craze that we don't see truly dying off. Port Moody is one of those neighbourhoods that you wont want to leave, it has it all for the suburbs. You are only 30 minutes to downtown (on days without traffic), you're close to West Coast Express, Close to Lakes (Buntzen, White Pine Beach) and the Ocean, You have restaurants, shopping within a 5 minute drive or walk, and you are close to Coquitlam Centre for all the rest of your needs. It's population will continue to expand so keep you eye on this gem of the tri-cities.

 

 

Places to Eat/Drink/See in Port Moody:

 

Our top places to explore in Port Moody are: Romer's Burgers, JJ Bean, Gallagher's Cafe, Caffe Diviano, Browns Social House, Nagano Sushi, Yellowdog Brewery, Parkside Brewery, Moody Ales, Twin Sails Brewery, Charlie & Carlos, Brew Street, Boat House, Rocky Point Ice Cream and The Burrard.

 

 

If you're in the city check out these parks: Rocky Point Park, Buntzen Lake, White Pine Beach, Belcarra.

 

 

If you are thinking of moving or selling in Port Moody, don't hesitate to give me a call!

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