Removing Stains From Rugs And Carpeting

 

Something has just spilled on your favorite rug or carpet. There's a stain forming. You're worried. Will you be able to remove it? Will the stain set and stay forever?

Luckily, there's a good chance you can completely lift just about any kind of stain – if you follow a few guidelines.

The first rule of stain removal is: act fast. The fresher the stain, the easier it is to lift. So when you notice a stain of any kind, start to work on it right away. Don't wait.

Begin by trying to dry blot the stain. Avoid the temptation of using a wet cloth or detergent, at least at this stage of the game. Blot the stain gently with a clean, dry cloth or absorbent paper towel. Be patient. It may take several minutes before you see any results.

If dry blotting doesn't completely lift the stain, mix up a combination of one glass of water with one teaspoon of lemon juice. Again, take a clean cloth or paper towel, wet it with the water/lemon mixture, and gently blot the area (test on an inconspicuous area first). Wait five minutes, then try dry blotting again.

You may have to repeat the above process a few times.

Using a vacuum cleaner directly over the affected area can also help lift more of the stain.

If, after all your efforts, some of the stain is still there, place a couple of sheets of paper towel over the stain, with a few books on top to maintain pressure. Leave those there for 24 hours. Check every hour or so. If you see stain on the paper towels, you know it's working.

If all else fails, consider calling in a professional cleaner. They know all the tricks and can often perform a miracle for you!

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If you are buying real estate as an investment either for cash flow or as a second home, then this is the perfect market condition for you. When there are more sellers than buyers, you have more bargaining power. If you are able to negotiate a better deal and pay a little less for the property you are looking for, it simply makes the deal that much more affordable.

 

conclusion: you should be hoping for a market correction.

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It is very rare that someone buys something without selling something first, and vice versa. If you are a homeowner and you’re looking for the right time to sell your house so you can buy another, you may be concerned that the price of your current home is dropping. But let’s take a closer look at that: assume the value of the house you are selling drops by 10 per cent. Let’s also assume that you plan to buy another home (whether upsizing or downsizing). The key to remember in a downturn market is that the person selling their home to you is going through the exact same thing. In other words, if the value of your home dropped 10 per cent, so too did the value of the new home you are buying. Focus on what your bottom line “net” is, rather than what you thought or had hoped to sell your home for.


conclusion: in most cases, the net effect of a market correction is zero.

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Pick up any newspaper today and no one could blame you if you got a little worried about the state of the economy or the fear of a pending maket correction in Canadian real estate.

 

What if Greece defaults?  What about the "fiscal Cliff" in the US?  Are Canadians taking on too much debt?  Have mortgage rules gone too far?  Is there a housing bubble about to burst?  What if there is a market correction?

 

The real question is, do Canadian homeowners or prospective buyers need to be concerned?  Every time there is talk about a market correction in Canadian real estate, the tone is quite negatiave.  But let's take a closer look at that situation: rather than argue about whether we may have a market correction, let's analyze what it really means to Canadians if there is one.

 

FIRST TIME HOMEBUYERS:

 

If you are a first time homebuyer, you have likely felt the pinch of the rising cost of housing, and the new mortgage rules certainly haven't helped any either.  So a slight market correction would be welcome news for you.  You can still get into homeownership with only five per cent down, but since your maximum amortization is now limited to only 25 years, a drop in pricing is exactly what you'll need to be able to get into this market.

 

CONCLUSION:

A market correction is a good thing for you.

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